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Posts tagged links

'Virtual Unreality’ by Charles Seife: review

“Virtual Unreality,” the latest book by the New York University journalism Professor Charles Seife, is certain of one thing: The Internet is filled with misinformation. It’s on rockier territory when it comes to the nature of this misinformation and the degree of the problem, much less what it all means. Early on, though, Seife comes out full of smoke: “Bad information is a disease that attacks the brain,” he warns. “It messes with your head, making you do things that you shouldn’t.”

I reviewed Charles Seife’s “Virtual Unreality” for the San Francisco Chronicle.

My short story from the recent issue of The Normal School is now online. It’s called "The Most Famous Drone Pilot in America."

My short story from the recent issue of The Normal School is now online. It’s called "The Most Famous Drone Pilot in America."

Apple's Watch Is Like a High-Tech Mood Ring

Area Man Offers Opinion on New Product

Loose Tweets Sink Ships

My latest for Politico Magazine. On the Islamic State’s media strategy — its strengths and weaknesses, and whether tech companies are obligated to do something about it.

For Politico Magazine, I wrote about the State Department’s Center for Strategic Counterterrorism Communications and how social media is seen as a new battleground between jihadist and western government propaganda.

In the latest issue of The Baffler, I wrote about Processed World, a now-defunct Bay Area magazine that responded to an earlier wave of tech-driven gentrification. PW had a lot of smart things to say about work and its discontents, the computerization of the workplace, and a host of issues — corporate power, income inequality, unacknowledged forms of labr — that still matter today. If you want to read back issues of PW, try the Internet Archive or Bad Attitude, an anthology of the mag’s early years.

My latest is an essay for The New Inquiry on the Internet of Things. It’s about tech hucksterism, surveillance, feature creep, the world as feedback mechanism, the dubious promise of better living through data, and the appeal of dumb products.

My latest is an essay for The New Inquiry on the Internet of Things. It’s about tech hucksterism, surveillance, feature creep, the world as feedback mechanism, the dubious promise of better living through data, and the appeal of dumb products.

Knocking Off YouTube’s Populist Halo | Blog | The Baffler

My latest for The Baffler: YouTube strong-arming indie record labels, the new media gatekeepers, and the glut of streaming music services.

“Citizen Koch” and the Oligarchic Slide | Blog | The Baffler

My latest for The Baffler — on the documentary “Citizen Koch,” money in politics, and Citizens United as a kind of conspiracy.

'Dragnet Nation' looks at the hidden systems that are always looking at you

I reviewed Julia Angwin’s book about surveillance for the LA Times.

For The New Republic, I dreamed up, in the paranoid style, some worst-case scenarios for Google’s robotics projects.

I interviewed Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Philip Schultz about The Wherewithal, his new novel in verse. Topics discussed: the Shoah, Vietnam, being down and out in 1967 San Francisco, welfare, the poor as a minority, the specter of the Zodiac killer, failure, and using Wittgenstein as armor. Read it here.